An HIV-resistant baby in China?

In a controversial experiment conducted by a Chinese scientist named Ha Jiankui, a genetic edit on a twin genome was performed. During this process they deleted the CCR5 gene, which is considered essential in the process of HIV virus infiltration into the blood cells. 

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The result: The baby cannot be infected with HIV and can transmit immunity to her offspring as well.

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In recent years there has been tremendous progress in the human ability to manipulate genetic code, mainly thanks to a scientific tool known as CRISPR. However, genetic editing is considered prohibited in most countries and not just for ethical reasons. Our knowledge is not yet great enough to know that the changes we make to the genetic code won’t cause harmful effects further down the line.

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In his book, Homo Deus, Yuval Harari refers to what lies ahead in the future of human creation. 'At first they will resist it, but then the medical argument will come. To cure and prevent serious illnesses, it will be easy to convince the public to make changes to the genetic code and this will lead to talk. Gradually we will just get to the stage where planning a baby is perceived as legitimate.

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It is still unclear where the world is going, and how we will deal with these moral dilemmas. What is certain is that new advances in the genetic field are going to affect the pharmaceutical industry, our health, our longevity - and therefore many different industries directly and indirectly. Such changes create new opportunities, which can infiltrate content at the right time, can affect millions of people and create new business or products.

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Businesses that want to be in the right time and place to take advantage of such opportunities need to know how to move fast. Take risks. Experiment with new things, new products, new audiences. In short, they should act like a startup. 

Jolt. Teaching startup business.